salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

ratak-monodosico:

“For me, seeing the ocean is just very primal,” Roz Chast says about her “Venus on the Beach” cover. We reached Chast in Narragansett, where she’s vacationing with her family. “We’ve been coming up here for about twenty-five years,” she continues. “I feel like I have to go back every summer. I don’t know. I need to see the ocean again—to make sure it’s still there, I guess. And I go in eventually, no matter what the weather. Maybe this has something to do with growing up in Brooklyn and always going to the beach when I was a kid. First to Brighton, and then to Manhattan Beach. Now going to the beach is a very important part of my life, and of our kids’ lives—at least in the summer.”

The New Yorker

ratak-monodosico:

“For me, seeing the ocean is just very primal,” Roz Chast says about her “Venus on the Beach” cover. We reached Chast in Narragansett, where she’s vacationing with her family. “We’ve been coming up here for about twenty-five years,” she continues. “I feel like I have to go back every summer. I don’t know. I need to see the ocean again—to make sure it’s still there, I guess. And I go in eventually, no matter what the weather. Maybe this has something to do with growing up in Brooklyn and always going to the beach when I was a kid. First to Brighton, and then to Manhattan Beach. Now going to the beach is a very important part of my life, and of our kids’ lives—at least in the summer.”

The New Yorker

(Fonte: newyorker.com)

ratak-monodosico:

Part of me was afraid of what I would find and what I would do when I got there. I knew the risks, or imagined I knew. But the thing I felt the most, much stronger than fear, was the desire to confront him.

(Fonte: jacques-audiard)